We've Narrowed it Down to 5. Out of These 5 Book Characters Which One Would You Like To See Robert Pattinson Play on the Big Screen

The other day we did a poll asking you guys which book character you’d like to see Robert Pattinson play on the big screen. We went through all your answer (awesome discussions by the way) and narrowed it down to 5 book characters. For those of you who’ve never read the books I’ve attached a little summary to each one. If you love reading and haven’t read The Bronze Horseman I highly recommend it. It’s an amazing book!

Here are the 5 characters:

Holden Caulfield – Catcher in the Rye

Novel by J.D. Salinger, published in 1951. The influential and widely acclaimed story details the two days in the life of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield after he has been expelled from prep school. Confused and disillusioned, he searches for truth and rails against the “phoniness” of the adult world. You can read more here.

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Alexander Belov – The Bronze Horseman

Set in her native St. Petersburg, Russia, Simons’s latest thick novel (after Tully, etc.) focuses on a WWII love affair. As the story opens, Tatiana, the youngest member of the Metanova family, is just 17; she still shares a bed with her older sister, Dasha. Not long after the country goes to war with Germany, Tatiana meets Alexander, a soldier, and sparks fly. It turns out, however, that Alexander is the same soldier Dasha has been crowing about. Possessed of a strong sense of family loyalty, and living under conditions that permit no privacy, Tatiana refuses to interfere with her sister’s happiness, but the attraction between Tatiana and Alexander proves too powerful. Complicating matters, another soldier, Dimitri, has information that could destroy Alexander, and Dimitri likes Tatiana, too. In order to protect both Dasha’s feelings and Alexander’s life, the star-crossed lovers become part of a deceptive quadrangle as war intensifies around them. Taking her title from a tragic poem by Alexandr Pushkin, Simons skillfully highlights the ironies of the socialist utopia. Read more here.

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Jamie Fraser – Outlander /Cross Stitch (UK Title)

Absorbing and heartwarming, this first novel lavishly evokes the land and lore of Scotland, quickening both with realistic characters and a feisty, likable heroine. English nurse Claire Beauchamp Randall and husband Frank take a second honeymoon in the Scottish Highlands in 1945. When Claire walks through a cleft stone in an ancient henge, she’s somehow transported to 1743. She encounters Frank’s evil ancestor, British captain Jonathan “Black Jack” Randall, and is adopted by another clan. Claire nurses young soldier James Fraser, a gallant, merry redhead, and the two begin a romance, seeing each other through many perilous, swashbuckling adventures involving Black Jack. Scenes of the Highlanders’ daily life blend poignant emotions with Scottish wit and humor. Read more here.

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Heathcliff  – Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is a house on the lonely moors of Yorkshire in the north of England. Here a tragic love story unfolds as Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliffe fall in love. But Cathy marries another man, Edgar Linton, and breaks Heathcliffe’s heart. Returning years later, he takes his revenge on the Linton family. Will the ghosts of Wuthering Heights ever be still? The passionate and emotionally- charged classic from Emily Bronte. Read more here.

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Mr. Darcy – Pride & Prejudice

Austen trains her sights on a country village and a few families–in this case, the Bennets, the Philips, and the Lucases. Into their midst comes Mr. Bingley, a single man of good fortune, and his friend, Mr. Darcy, who is even richer. Mrs. Bennet, who married above her station, sees their arrival as an opportunity to marry off at least one of her five daughters. Bingley is complaisant and easily charmed by the eldest Bennet girl, Jane; Darcy, however, is harder to please. Put off by Mrs. Bennet’s vulgarity and the untoward behavior of the three younger daughters, he is unable to see the true worth of the older girls, Jane and Elizabeth. His excessive pride offends Lizzy, who is more than willing to believe the worst that other people have to say of him; when George Wickham, a soldier stationed in the village, does indeed have a discreditable tale to tell, his words fall on fertile ground. Read more here.


So which one would you like to see Rob play? Leave a comment below and we’ll tally the votes!

*All book summaries are from Amazon

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