Archive for September 6, 2011

Bigger Version of the New Breaking Dawn Still Featuring Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart   1 comment

Here’s a bigger version of the new Breaking Dawn still featuring Robert Pattinson & Kristen Stewart from Premiere Magazine.

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The True Meaning of Remember Me   39 comments

With the tenth anniversary of 9/11 right around the corner I thought it would be a good opportunity to look back on Remember Me and what critics failed to notice or chose to ignore. 

When  Remember Me was released, critics were up in arms over the ending of the film, which ends with the main character, Tyler Hawkins (Robert Pattinson), dying in the Twin Towers. Critics ranted that it was a cheap way to end the movie and simply means to an end. It hit a nerve and caused a strong emotional reaction. They believed that 9/11 was used simply to end the movie. What they failed to realize was that the entire story was based on September 11th. That the ending was the reason for the entire film and that the premise of the movie was built around the ending and not the other way around. Maybe it was too soon, maybe the critics weren’t ready to be hit in the face with a surprise 9/11 ending. 

Remember Me was about September 11th, it always had been.  Fetters has long said that the main reason he wrote the script to Remember Me was because of the way 9/11 impacted him. The entire point of the movie was to put a name and a face on the people who died during those awful last moments of the Twin Towers. Instead of making them a statistic, Will Fetters humanized them and gave them a voice . 

What happened in the Twin Towers that day was horrific and had a direct impact on many. However many others watched  the scenes unravelling before them, from afar, in total shock and abject horror. These people saw the events unfold, but had no connection to people in the World Trade Center or the Tower themselves. They saw it as a horrible tragedy, as a whole, a specific incident that affected many lives. They understood the scope of the event and catastrophe, however how could they truly understand how it was for those who lived it? Those who lost someone? This is where Remember Me comes in. Remember Me gave those people a name. When you give a character a voice and make him real to viewers, only then can they truly understand the impact it had on those who were directly affected. Will Fetters managed to do this brilliantly. 

Remember Me will always be about September 11th 2001 and a testament to those who died that faithful sunny September morning. I hope that one day, the critics will come to realize it. 

5 New/Old Pics of Robert Pattinson at the WFE Barcelona Press Conference/Photocall now in HQ   Leave a comment

5 New/Old Pics of Rob at the WFE Press Conference/Photocall now in HQ

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*SCAN* Water for Elephants” in “Télé 2 Semaines” Magazine – France   1 comment

Here’s a scan of WFE in Télé 2 Semaines magazine

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*scans* Robert Pattinson in Premiere Magazine (with New Breaking Dawn still)   9 comments

See the rest after the jump!!

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Julia Jones talks about working with Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner   2 comments

Julia Jones talks about working with Rob and Taylor in an interview with Cosmopolitan

What was it like to work with Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner?
At this point it’s bizarrely normal. When we go to work everyone is focused on their roles and the scene so you’re not thinking about them as heart-throbs – they feel more like colleagues. I am reminded of the fact that they’re huge movie stars pretty much all of the time besides when we’re at work.

Do you think it’s funny to see Rob and Taylor portrayed as heartthrobs? What’s it like to walk the red carpet alongside those two?
I don’t think it’s funny – I totally get it! At events you can always tell when one of them has arrived because the fans’ screaming hits a pitch I didn’t know was humanly possible before Twilight.

Read more over at Cosmopolitan

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Great Water for Elephants Blu-Ray Review by WhatCulture: ‘Water for Elephants Is a Hollywood Romance To Remember’   2 comments

Here’s a great WFE review by What Culture

Of course Water For Elephants was always going to carry the subtitle of What Robert Pattinson Did Next, and as such the myriad fansites dedicated to the Twilight star (my favourite of which is called SpunkRansom) quickly took it to their hearts. But look beyond the name that is top-billed, alongside Reese Witherspoon and everyone’s favourite German Christoph Waltz, and you’ll find a film worthy of watching on its own terms.

There is something fundamentally old-fashioned about the way the romance plays out on screen, and that vintage feel has a lot to do with the authenticity of the period setting, down to the most minute of details. There is a lot of time in the Extra Features spent detailing the near obsessive level of research and painstaking reconstructions that formed the basis for the production and costume designs, and that diligence really shines in the final film.

But Water For Elephants deserves better than that: it is beautifully designed, and wonderfully executed thanks to a head-turning combination of director Francis Lawrence, production designer extraordinaire Jack Fisk and the hugely talented cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto. Together, and along with costume designer Jacqueline West, the team create a lavish canvas on which the acting work can be done.

RPattz as he is hideously known to fans and media outlets that should know better has done very well to make Water For Elephants in a gap between Twilight projects, and it stands as a timely reminder that if allowed, the young actor could very well make a second go of an acting career after the Stephanie Meyer franchise has disappeared from the multiplexes for the last time. Though presumably, he’s going to need to make an “off-brand” choice that once and for all puts a stake through the heart of Edward Cullen.

Read the rest of the review over at What Culture